Puree Sirasoontorn and Praipol Koomsup

Energy Transition in Thailand

On the example of Thailand, this publication looks at the political and social factors that drive—but also hamper—socially just energy transitions in Asia.

 

Tackling climate change will not be possible without a significant contribution from Asia. According to economic forecasts, Asia’s share of global greenhouse gas emissions will grow dramatically in the coming decades.

Thailand is facing an increasing pressure to provide energy security to its population as a result of the depletion of some domestic resources and public resistance against others, while maintain the electricity price at an acceptable rate. At the same time, it has also set ambitious goals in its NDC under the Paris Agreement on Climate.

There is a growing interest in renewable energy in many parts of Asia, including Thailand. Greater use of renewable energy may be a good solution to Thailand's energy challenges and lead to more socially and environmentally just energy structures.

This publication is a part of Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung's regional project on energy transition in Asia, where the authors of each case study in China, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Thailand and Vietnam worked with Miranda Schreurs, Professor of Environmental and Climate Policy in the Bavarian School of Public Policy, Technical University of Munich, to provide an in-depth analysis of the situation in their respective countries.

 

Energy transition in Thailand

Sirasoontorn, Puree; Koomsup, Praipol

Energy transition in Thailand

challenges and opportunities
Bangkok, 2017

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